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CPAP Mcallen TX

Local resource for CPAP in Mcallen. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to sleep aids, sleep centers, sleep apnea treatment, breathing aids, breathing apparatuses and sleep exercises, as well as advice and content on sleep treatment and devices.

Rio Grande Valley Sleep Centers
(956) 630-2844
2101 S. Cynthia
McAllen, TX
Doctors Refferal
Recommended, but self referred accepted.
Ages Seen
5+
Insurance
Insurance: All
Medicare: Yes
Medicaid: Yes

Pulmonary and Sleep Center of the Valley
(956) 447-5557
1604 E. 8th Street
Weslaco, TX
Doctors Refferal
Preferred. Self-referrals also accepted.
Ages Seen
>/=2
Insurance
Insurance: Information available on our website
Medicare: Yes
Medicaid: Yes

Christian F Maluf Russo, MD
1200 S Col Rowe Blvd
McAllen, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Auto De Santo Domingo (Uasd), Fac De Cien Med, Santo Domingo
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Rodrigo Lema, MD
1801 S 5th St
McAllen, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Pontificia Bolivariana, Fac De Med, Medellin, Colombia
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Prakash Palimar, MD
(210) 686-0578
1801 S 5th St Ste 210
McAllen, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Karnataka Inst Med Sci, Karnataka Univ, Hubli, Karnataka, India
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Valley Intensivists, Pulmonologists and Sleep Specialists
(956) 688-6300
1200 E. Savannah Avenue
Mcallen, TX
Ages Seen
18+

Walter Zawislak, MD
McAllen, TX
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Diseases
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ross Univ, Sch Of Med & Vet Med, Roseau, Dominica
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
Juan Pablo Gomez
(956) 688-6300
1200 E Savannah Ave
Mcallen, TX
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease

Data Provided By:
Ramon I Rodriguez
(956) 631-3344
1200 E Savannah Ste 16
Mcallen, TX
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease

Data Provided By:
Juan Rivera
(956) 631-3344
1200 E Savannah Ste 16
Mcallen, TX
Specialty
Pulmonary Disease

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

CPAP's

CPAPs (continuous positive airway pressure devices) & Masks

 

Summary of Sleep Disordered Breathing

In the U.S. alone, there are approximately 40 million adults in the U.S. who suffer from sleep disordered breathing. The industry itself remains less than 10% penetrated on a global basis. Going back a couple of years ago, basically people thought you had to be a 60 or 70 year old obese male in order to have this disorder, when the reality is that most people being diagnosed today are in their 30's, 40's and 50's.     

More than 90% of the cases remain untreated. In fact, the United States is probably the most penetrated market in the world. It is assumed to be about 12% or so of the cases that have been identified. In most other countries in the world it's less than 5% and, in fact in most nations it's less than 1% of the affected population that has been identified.

The bottleneck within the industry has remained the diagnostic capability.  

CPAP Devices

CPAP stands for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and is the most effective and widely used method of treating sleep apnea. The CPAP device does not breathe for you. You can breathe at a normal rate.

A CPAP device provides air pressure through a face mask to help keep the breathing passage open during sleep.

Types of Masks

Nasal Masks

This type of interface requires breathing through the nose and keeping the mouth closed. a chin strap can be worn with the nasal mask to help accomplish this, if needed.

A correctly fitting nasal mask extends from the bridge of the nose to the bottom of the upper lip without touching the sides of the nose or going above the top of the mouth.

Oral Masks

These are a good option for those who breathe through their mouths. Oral masks can be used with or without headgear, and have a flap that goes in front of the teeth and another flap that goes outside the mouth. The inner flap is enough to hold it in place during the day, but at night, an oral mask requires a strap.

A correctly fitting mask covers the entire mouth. To ensure a proper fit, it's important to find an inner flap that fits your mouth. The mask has an adjustment knob for changing the separation between the inner and outer flaps.

Full Face Masks

For those who breathe through both the nose and mouth, full face masks are the way to go. Their breathing flexibility makes them a favorite for nighttime use.

Some full masks reach from the bridge of the nose to the bottom of the mouth and others reach from the nose bridge to below the chin. Still, others cover the entire face, including the eyes. Full masks distribute the pressure over a wider area, which can mean less skin irritation.

While some feel more claustrophobic with a full mask, others prefer them to nasal masks with chin straps because they don't want their mouths held shut. Full masks also are better for people with...

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Note: sleepweb.com does NOT provide medical advice or diagnoses. You should always consult your physician first, before

taking any new medications or undergoing any sleep disorder therapy program, or if you are suffering from a medical condition.

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